Applying the Basic Equation Transformation Rules

The ability to apply the equation transformation rules is one of the most important skills that math students can learn. When they recognize that a given graph is just a geometric transformation of the graph of some familiar basic equation, it’s relatively easy for them to find the equation of the graph. Likewise, when they recognize that a given equation is just an algebraically transformed familiar basic equation, it’s relatively easy for them to draw a sketch of the graph.

Most functions and relations beginning algebra through calculus students encounter are the result of applying an ordered series of algebraic transformations to a basic equation. Each algebraic transformation applied results in a geometric transformation of the equation’s graph. A set of basic equation transformation rules describes how graphs can be translated, reflected, and rotated.

In this post, we will see how the equation transformation rules can be used to transform the graph of the square root function. To best understand this demonstration, download the free handout Equation Transformation Rules from www.mathteachersresource.com/instructional-content.html. It contains a succinct summary of the equation transformation rules, a simple explanation of why some of the counterintuitive rules work, and examples that show how the transformation rules can be applied. This handout is a helpful resource for both students and teachers.

EquationTrans-Edit1

EquationTrans-Edit1EquationTrans-Edit1EquationTrans-Edit1

EquationTrans-Edit1 EquationTrans-Edit1

Teaching Points:

  • The biggest mistake students make is replacing x with x + k or x – k. Remind students to enclose x + k or x – k in parentheses and then simplify the equation.
  • When reflecting the graph over the y-axis, replace every x with (-x) and then simplify the equation.
  • When finding the equation of a given graph, results should be checked by picking a few key points on the given graph and then determine whether or not the x-y coordinates of these key points fit the equation.
  • When finding the equation of a graph, teach students how they should see a graph.
    Example 1: I see a line with a slope of 3 that has been slide horizontally 7 units to the right.
    Example 2: I see a cosine curve, amplitude of 4, that has been flipped over the x-axis.
    Example 3: I see a circle, radius of 4, that has been stretched vertically by a factor of 5/2.
  • Depending on the course content, students should be required to memorize the equation, the shape, and the properties of basic functions and relations. Students can make flash cards.

The above graphs, created with the program Basic Trig Functions, are offered by Math Teacher’s Resource. The program has features that facilitate learning and teaching the equation transformation rules. You can enter an equation in any of the formats shown in the examples above. Except for exponents, all equations are entered like any equation in a textbook. For example: The inequality 2x – 10Sin3(3x) + 4y2 ≤ 25 is entered as 2x -10Sin(3x)^3 + 4y^2 ≤ 25. Relationships can be implicitly or explicitly defined. The program automatically figures out how to treat an equation or inequality, and shading of all inequality relations is automatic. You can specify whether to shade the intersection or union of a system of inequalities.

The user interface, simple and intuitive for all program modules, provides numerous sample equations along with comments and suggestions for setting screen parameters in order to achieve best results. After an equation is graphed, you can plot a point on a graph near the mouse cursor and view the x-y coordinates of the plotted point. In addition to plotting points, you can find relative minimum points, relative maximum points, x-intercepts and intersection points with simple mouse control clicks. A Help menu provides a quick summary of all of the magical mouse control clicks. Of course, all graphs can be copied to the clipboard and pasted into another document. Go to www.mathteachersresource.com to view multiple screen shots of the program’s modules. Click the ‘learn more’ button in the TRIGONOMETRIC FUNCTIONS section. Teachers will find useful comments at the bottom of each screen shot.

A Simple Way to Introduce Complex Numbers

Mendelb-1-brown-300Complex numbers don’t make any sense. How can such weird numbers have any real use? The term “imaginary part” suggests that complex numbers are fake, cooked up by a bunch of crackpot mathematicians. That’s what I thought when I was in high school. But since my high school days, I’ve learned to use complex numbers to solve AC circuit problems, to do 2D vector math, to really appreciate the fundamental theorem of algebra, and to explore the famous Mandelbrot set. Complex numbers are now an essential tool in almost every branch of mathematics, science, and engineering.

In previous posts, I discussed how teachers can help students better understand and use the quadratic formula. But in order to have a complete understanding of the quadratic formula, it’s necessary to have a basic understanding of complex numbers.

I begin my introduction to complex numbers by asking my students to imagine that they are 3rd grade students who know the basic whole number addition and multiplication facts. I then have them consider how they, a 3rd grade student, would answer the six questions below.

PrintAfter some discussion, my students agree that a 3rd grader would correctly answer questions 1, 2, and 5, but would not be able to answer questions 3, 4, and 6, because they don’t know about negative numbers and fractions. When those 3rd graders grow older and learn about fractions and negative numbers, they will be able to answer questions 3 and 4 correctly.

My students, not the 3rd graders, can correctly answer questions 1 – 5 but can’t correctly answer question 6, because they don’t know about the strange complex number i where i = √(-1) and i2 = -1. I explain that 7i * 7i = 49i2 = 49(-1) = -49. I tell students that all numbers after the counting numbers (1, 2, 3, . . .) are inventions of the human intellect and were invented to solve specific types of equations. It has been said, “God gave man the counting numbers, and man invented all the other numbers.”

In the next part of the lesson, I develop a list of the powers of the complex number i. The list of powers and the graph below enable students to easily see the circular pattern in the powers of i. (Note: i3 = i2 *i = (-1)i = -i and i4 = i2 * i2 = (-1)(-1) = 1)

Mathbolog16-Amended-Edit1

After they learn about the powers of the complex number i, I show students how to plot a complex number and how to graph a complex number as a vector because all complex numbers have a magnitude and direction. Initially, students find it strange that complex numbers don’t have a negative property like some real numbers. Example: If the complex number z = 6 – 12i, then –z = -6 + 12i. I tell students that they should say, “the opposite of z,” for the symbol –z. The graph below shows complex number -9 + 6i and its conjugate -9 – 6i graphed as vectors. The other complex numbers in the graph below are graphed as a single point. Of course, 0 + 8i = 8i.

Mathbolog16-Amended-Edit1

If time allows after the main lesson, I show students some interesting geometric patterns generated by the powers and roots of complex numbers. Students will learn how these pattern come about when they study De Moivre’s Theorem in a later course. It’s fun to make conjectures about the patterns. The left graph shows z, z2, z3, . . . , z20 where z = 1.15Cos(350) + 1.15Sin(350)i. The right graph shows the 12 12th roots of -4,096.

Mathbolog16-Amended-Edit1

You can download the student and teacher versions of the free handout Introduction to Complex Numbers from www.mathteachersresource.com/instructional-content.html. This handout has two pages of exercises and student activities that I use to introduce my students to complex numbers. We usually work about a third of the problems together and the remaining exercises are left as homework. To make your presentations more dynamic, project graphs on a screen and use simple mouse control clicks to plot points and draw vectors.

Teaching Points: (Of course, teachers can modify the lesson to meet the needs of their class.)

  • Read and study the free handout Introduction to Complex Numbers. As the lesson progresses, students should be taking notes and writing on a teacher provided student version of the handout.
  • Some of the exercises involve calculating the absolute value of a complex number. Remind students that the absolute value of any number equals the positive distance of the number from zero, and therefore the theorem of Pythagoras can be used to calculate the absolute of a complex number. The absolute value of any nonzero number is always a positive real number, and i is never used to describe the absolute value of a complex number.
  • Point out the geometric relationship between a complex number and its conjugate. After doing the exercises in the handout, many students see a way to use the conjugate to calculate the absolute value of a complex number.
  • The handout Introduction to Complex Numbers covers all of the basic types of complex number arithmetic problems that an advanced algebra, trig, or precalculus student would be expected to handle. When appropriate, the polar form of a complex number can be explained at a later time.
  • A geometric understanding of complex numbers is very important. Graphing complex numbers makes complex numbers more real to students. On homework and tests, have students graph various complex number expressions. Example: Let z = -8 + 4i. Graph and label each of the following as a vector: z, -z, 1.5z, -0.5z, and the conjugate of z.
  • If time allows, show students interesting geometric patterns generated by the powers and roots of a complex number. It is interesting to see what pattern observations that students come up with. Tell students that they will learn the details of how these patterns come about in a later course. In most elementary math courses, students are never exposed to the really cool and interesting aspects of mathematics.
  • Some students will claim that they can use their graphing calculators to get the answer in a matter of seconds. They are right. Remind them that they will not be allowed to use their graphing calculator on a test or quiz until they have demonstrated that they can do basic complex number arithmetic.

The above graphics were created with the program, Basic Trig Functions, which is offered by Math Teacher’s Resource. In addition to graphing x-y variable relations and polar functions, users can graph the powers or roots of a complex number, and view a list of the powers or roots which appears to the right of the graphic output. Segments or vectors can be drawn by left-clicking and dragging the mouse. The Edit/ Edit Graphics menu provides options for setting segment color, pen width, and head/tail parameters.

The user interface for all program modules is simple and intuitive. When graphing equations, users can select a sample equation which is automatically pasted into the active equation edit box. When appropriate, the program provides comments and suggestions for setting screen parameters to achieve best results. After an equation is graphed, you can plot a point on a graph near the mouse cursor and view the x-y coordinates of the plotted point. With simple mouse control clicks, you can find relative minimum points, relative maximum points, x-intercepts, and intersection points. A Help menu provides a quick summary of all magical mouse control clicks. Of course, all graphs can be copied to the clipboard and pasted into another document. To view multiple screen shots of the program’s modules, go to www.mathteachersresource.com. Click the “learn more” button in the TRIGONOMETRIC FUNCTIONS section. Teachers will find useful comments at the bottom of each screen shot.

 

 

A Different Way to Teach the Quadratic Formula

Quadratic-Formula-EuclidOne of my core beliefs is that, whenever possible, math concepts should be understood from both an algebraic and geometric point of view. In previous posts, we looked at how René Descartes (1596 – 1650) gave us the synthesis of algebra and geometry. Now let’s look at how teachers can help students understand the quadratic formula from both an algebraic and geometric point of view by using custom made handouts created with computer technology.

To best understand this discussion, download the student and teacher versions of the free handout Quadratic Formula (teacher version) from http://www.mathteachersresource.com/instructional-content.html. This handout provides six ideas for teacher-guided quadratic formula discovery/verification activities. During the lesson, students are expected to be actively engaged calculating values of expressions and writing on the handout, so in addition to a handout, they will need a calculator and ruler. To make your presentations more dynamic, project graphs on a screen as you plot points and draw line segments with simple mouse control clicks.

The graph of the equation y = x2 + 5x – 8 is shown below. This quadratic equation is the first equation considered in the free handout Quadratic Formula. The added graphics are the graphics that students would be expected to add as the lesson progresses.

Mathblog14,Edit1

The graph of the equation h = -16t2 + 132t + 60 is shown below. This equation is the fourth equation in the free handout, Quadratic Formula (student version). The activity is about a toy rocket that is shot upward with an initial vertical velocity of 132 feet/second. The added graphics are the graphics students would be expected to add as the lesson progresses. The slope of the secant line through (6.5, 242) and (7, 200) tells us that the average vertical velocity of the toy rocket over the time interval [6.5, 7] equals -84 feet/second. The goal of this activity is to show students how mathematics can be used to extract useful information from an equation.

Mathblog14,Edit1

Teaching Points: (Depending on the class, teachers need to give appropriate coaching.)

  • Students can be shown the derivation of the formula before the lesson or at a later time.
  • Teachers will have to demonstrate how to enter an expression into a calculator. Students will probably make mistakes initially. Practice is the only way to improve.
  • Teachers should have students use the graph to estimate answers before the actual calculation.
  • Students should learn how to express answers in decimal format, because radical format is too abstract.
  • Some answers require more than a simple numerical value. Teachers can dictate an English sentence that would be an appropriate way to answer the question. This is a good way for students to practice writing skills.
  • The equation h = -16t2 + 132t + 60 in the toy rocket activity describes the relationship between t and h in the gravitational field in which we live. Students will learn how this equation comes about when they take a course in physics. ( -16 equals ½ of the gravitational constant for planet earth, 132 ft/sec = the initial vertical velocity, and 60 feet = the initial height above ground level.)
  • Students and teachers can explore how gravity causes the average vertical velocity of an object to change over time.
  • If students understand the basics of complex numbers, teachers can present activities five and six in the Quadratic Formula handout.

The above graphics, created with the program Basic Trig Functions, is offered by Math Teacher’s Resource. Except for exponents, all equations are entered like any equation in a textbook. Example: The inequality 2x – 10Sin3(3x) + 4y2 ≤ 25 is entered as 2x -10Sin(3x)^3 + 4y^2 ≤ 25. Relationships can be implicitly or explicitly defined. The program automatically figures out how to treat an equation or inequality, and shading of all inequality relations is automatic. Users can specify whether to shade the intersection or union of a system of inequalities.

The user interface provides numerous sample equations along with comments and suggestions for setting screen parameters in order to achieve best results. The interface for all program modules is simple and intuitive. After an equation is graphed, users can plot a point on a graph near the mouse cursor and view the x-y coordinates of the plotted point. In addition, relative minimum points, relative maximum points, x-intercepts and, intersection points can be found with simple mouse control clicks. A Help menu provides a quick summary of all of the magical mouse control clicks. Of course, all graphs can be copied to the clipboard and pasted into another document. Go to www.mathteachersresource.com to view multiple screen shots of the program’s modules. Click the “learn more” button in the TRIGONOMETRIC FUNCTIONS section. Teachers will find useful comments at the bottom of each screen shot.

 

The Genius of René Descartes – Part 2 (The Parabola)

Utrecht_Weenix_Descartes-300In my previous blog, I discussed how René Descartes (1596 – 1650) discovered a way to synthesize geometry and algebra, which resulted in a revolution in mathematics. This synthesis is the reason Descartes is credited as the father of analytic of geometry. Because of Descartes’s discovery, we can derive an x-y variable equation that describes the relationship between x and y for every point (x, y) on a conic curve.

In this blog, I will discuss how teachers can use modern computer graphing technology to help students gain a better understanding of the definition of a parabola and the equation of a parabola. In a future blog, I will discuss some of the magical properties and applications of the parabola. This discussion is intended to provide teachers with a general approach to teach the parabola. The specific approach is left to the discretion of the individual teacher. Teachers may want to provide a handout that students complete as the lesson progresses. Students should be required to use their calculators to make various calculations and verify specific facts during the lesson. When graphs are projected on a screen, presentations can be dynamic, especially with a moving trace mark and mouse drawn line segments.

Now for a quick review of the parabola. All parabolas are defined in terms of a fixed point, the focus of the parabola, and a fixed line, the directrix of the parabola. Point (x, y) is on the parabola if and only if the distance from (x, y) to the focus point equals the distance from (x, y) to the directrix line. All parabolas have an axis of symmetry and the directrix of the parabola is perpendicular to the axis of symmetry. The vertex and focus are on the axis of symmetry, and the vertex point is equidistant from the focus and directrix. Study the basic parabolic graph below.

The Genius of RenŽ Descartes Blog - 2

Teaching Points: (Depending on the class, teachers need to give appropriate coaching.)

  • Similar to the graph above, show the graph of a parabola and its directrix, in a handout and or on a projection screen.
  • Students should be told something about a focus point and the directrix line but not the definition of a parabola. The definition of a parabola and the derivation of the equation will come at a later time.
  • For at least four points (x, y) on the parabola, have students use the theorem of Pythagoras to calculate the distance from (x, y) to the focus and from (x, y) to the directrix line.
  • Hopefully, most students will realize an amazing property of the parabola. For every point (x, y) on the parabola, the distance from (x, y) to the focus always equals the distance from (x, y) to the directrix. The class can experiment with other points on the parabola.
  • Repeat the experiment with the equation y = 0.75x2. Does this new parabola have the same amazing property?
  • Consider the parabola with equation y = kx2. How does changing k change the focus point? In general, how does changing k affect the shape of the graph? If we know the focus point of the parabola, can we find the equation of the parabola? Teachers and students can answer these questions by experimenting and just fiddling around with a computer graphing program.
  • In another lesson, teachers can show students how the equation y = kx2 comes about. Since all parabolas are geometrically similar figures, the equation of most parabolas can be found by applying the standard equation transformations rules.
  • Special equation transformation rotation rules:
    Rotate graph 90 degrees counterclockwise about (0, 0): Replace x with –y and y with x.
    Rotate graph 90 degrees clockwise about (0, 0): Replace x with y and y with –x.
    Rotate graph 180 degrees about (0, 0): Replace x with -x and y with –y.
  • Homework practice problems and exam questions.
    Given the vertex and focus of a parabola, have students find the equation of the parabola and sketch the graph of the parabola and the directrix.
    Given the graph of a parabola with key points, find the equation of the parabola, find the x-y coordinates of the focus and find the equation of the directrix line.

Teachers might consider allowing students to have some fun by having them do a project in which they are told to experiment and fiddle around with a computer graphing program to see what interesting relation graphs they can come up with. I can guarantee that an inquisitive student will come up with a graph that no human in the history of mankind as ever seen. Other than myself and some of my students, no human has ever seen the graph of the relation 2xSin(3x) + 2y = 3yCos(x + 2y) + 1.

The above graphic, created with the program Basic Trig Functions, is offered by Math Teacher’s Resource. Except for exponents, all equations are entered like any equation in a text book. Example: The inequality 2x – 10Sin3(3x) + 4y2 ≤ 25 is entered as 2x -10Sin(3x)^3 + 4y^2 ≤ 25. Relationships can be implicitly or explicitly defined. The program automatically figures out how to treat an equation or inequality, and shading of all inequality relations is automatic. Users can specify whether to shade the intersection or union of a system of inequalities. The user interface provides numerous sample equations along with comments and suggestions for setting screen parameters in order to achieve best results. The user interface for all program modules is simple and intuitive. After an equation is graphed, users can plot a point on a graph near the mouse cursor and view the x-y coordinates of the plotted point. In addition to plotting points, relative minimum points, relative maximum points, x-intercepts and intersection points can be found with simple mouse control clicks. A Help menu gives users a quick summary of all of the magical mouse control clicks. Of course, all graphs can be copied to the clipboard and pasted into another document. Go to www.mathteachersresource.com to view multiple screen shots of the program’s modules. Click the ‘learn more’ button in the TRIGONOMETRIC FUNCTIONS section (or click here). Teachers will find useful comments at the bottom of each screen shot.

The Genius of René Descartes – Part 1

Descartes-300René Descartes (1596 – 1650), a French philosopher, mathematician and writer, discovered a way to synthesize geometry and algebra that resulted in a revolution in mathematics and science. Without Descartes’s brilliant insight, it would not have been possible to develop differential calculus, integral calculus, and many other branches of mathematics. What was revolutionary to Descartes’s contemporaries, now seems natural and almost intuitively obvious, a part of our culture. (Before Isaac Newton, the concept of gravity was unknown, and now all adults and most children know something about gravity.)

So what was Descartes’s world changing discovery all about? He first invented a right angle based coordinate system in which every point in the Euclidean plane is assigned a unique ordered pair of numbers, which represents the point’s location, denoted by (x, y) where both x and y are real numbers. He then demonstrated how to create algebraic equations or formulas to calculate the distance between two points, midpoint of a line segment, and the slope of a line. With these basics established, he showed how to find an x-y variable equation that describes the relationship between the x-coordinate and y-coordinate for every point on a curve and only those points on the curve. Once the equation of a curve is known, the equation can be algebraically manipulated to reveal important properties of the curve and solve a wide variety of application problems.

The diagrams below illustrates how Descartes’s great discovery is used to calculate the distance between points A and B, and the slope of the line that contains points A and B. The distance calculation is, of course, a direct application of the theorem of Pythagoras. If we let AB equal the distance from point A to point B and let m equal the slope of the line that contains points A and B, then AB = √( 82 + (-6)2 ) = √(100) = 10 units, and m = Δy / Δx = -6/8 = -3/4 or -0.75.

The Genius of RenŽ Descartes Blog

From the definition of a conic section and the theorem of Pythagoras, we can derive an x-y variable equation that describes the relationship between x and y for every point (x, y) on the curve. Study the graph of the circle and its equation. If you listen carefully, you will hear Pythagoras whisper from his grave, “x squared plus y squared equals 4 squared for every point (x, y) on the circle.” The graphs below are the graphs of various conic curves and a line. All equations are special cases of the general conic equation Ax2 + Bxy + Cy2 + Dx + Ey + F = 0 where A, B, C, D, E, and F are real number constants.

Mathblog13-Edit1The above graphics, created with the program Basic Trig Functions, is offered by Math Teacher’s Resource. Except for exponents, all equations are entered as indicated to the right of the graphic. Example: The inequality x2 + 4y2 ≤ 64 is entered as x^2 + 4y^2 ≤ 64. Relationships can be implicitly or explicitly defined. The program automatically figures out how to treat an equation or inequality, and shading of all inequality relations is automatic. Users can specify whether to shade the intersection or union of a system of inequalities. The user interface provides numerous sample equations along with comments and suggestions for setting screen parameters in order to achieve best results.

The user interface for all program modules is simple and intuitive. After an equation is graphed, users can plot a point on a graph near the mouse cursor and view the x-y coordinates of the plotted point. In addition to plotting points, relative minimum points, relative maximum points, x-intercepts and intersection points can be found with simple mouse control clicks. A Help menu gives a quick summary of all the magical mouse control clicks. Go to www.mathteachersresource.com to view multiple screen shots of the program’s modules. Click the ‘learn more’ button in the TRIGONOMETRIC FUNCTIONS section (or click here). Teachers will find useful comments at the bottom of each screen shot.

Why is Division by Zero Forbidden?

Zero1What is 5/0? When I ask my beginning algebra students that question, the most popular incorrect answer they give me is 0. The next most popular incorrect answer is 5. After repeated reminders by their math teachers, students eventually learn that 5/0 is undefined, has no value, or is meaningless. (I once told a class of 9th grade algebra students that if they use their calculator to divide a number by zero, the calculator will explode in their face. One student looked at me and said, “Really?” I forgot how literal 9th graders can be. At least I got the student’s attention.) When I ask college algebra, trigonometry, statistics, technical math or calculus students why a number divided by zero is undefined, I either get an answer that begs the question or students say it’s simply a mathematical fact that they learned in a previous course.

So how do you explain division by zero? There are two ways. The first depends on a basic understanding of division of two numbers. It goes something like this: Students learn that a / b = c if and only if a = b*c. Therefore 986 / 58 = 17 because 58*17 = 986. Is 5 / 0 = 0? No, because 0 * 0 ≠ 5.   Is 5 / 0 = 5? No, because 0*5 ≠ 5. Since 0 times any number never equals 5, 5 / 0 is NOTHING or undefined. So what about 0 / 0? The problem here is that 0 times any number equals 0, and therefore 0 / 0 would have infinitely many answers, which in turn would be rather confusing. So we say that any number divided by zero is undefined.

The second explanation involves a deep mathematical insight from the 12th century Indian mathematician and astronomer, Bhāskara II, who developed the basic concepts of differential calculus. The 17th century European mathematicians, Newton and Leibniz, independently rediscovered differential calculus. This second explanation due to Bhāskara II goes something like this. Consider a single piece of fruit. If we divide 1 piece of fruit by ¼, we get 4 pieces of fruit. If we divide 1 piece of fruit by 1/10,000, we get 10,000 pieces of fruit. As 1 is divided by smaller and smaller numbers that approach zero, the number of pieces of fruit increases without bound. Therefore 1/0 = ∞ and, in general, n/0 = ±∞ if n does not equal 0.

Bhāskara II, Newton and Leibniz discovered the revolutionary concept of a limit of a function at a point, which enabled them to get around the problem of division by zero. Once that problem was solved, it was a relatively easy task to find methods to calculate a rate of change over a time interval of length zero, rate of change over a fleeting instant of time, or rate of change over a flux of time, as Newton would say. In The Ascent of Man, Dr. Bronowski tells the viewer, “In it, mathematics becomes a dynamic mode of thought, and that is a major mental step in the ascent of man.” Differential calculus is all about the mathematics of variable rates of change. I should mention that differential calculus students learn a slick technique for finding the limiting value of an x-variable expression as x approaches a constant k and the value of the expression when x = k is 0/0 or ∞/∞.

The graphic below shows the graphs of the functions y = 2Sin(x) and y = 2Csc(x) along with its vertical asymptotes. The graphs are color coded green, blue and red respectively. Because Csc(x) = 1 / Sin(x), the Csc(x) function is undefined at precisely those values of x where Sin(x) = 0. It’s interesting and fun to advance a trace mark cursor on the graphs of these functions. On both graphs, the horizontal velocity of the trace mark is constant, but the vertical velocity of the trace mark changes as the value of the x changes. As x approaches a vertical asymptote, the trace mark races towards ± ∞. Differential calculus gives us a complete understanding of the phenomena of the moving trace cursor.

Blog12graphic

The above graphic, created with the program Basic Trig Functions, is offered by Math Teacher’s Resource. The equations entered into the program were: y = 2Sin(x), y = 2Csc(x), and Sin(x) = 0. Go to www.mathteachersresource.com to view multiple screen shots of the program’s modules. Click the ‘learn more’ button in the TRIGONOMETRIC FUNCTIONS section. Teachers will find useful comments at the bottom of each screen shot.

Differential calculus is not only interesting and fun, but it can also be a stress reliever. At least it was for Omar Bradley, the famous American WWII general. He took a calculus book with him on battle campaigns, and when opportunity allowed, he worked differential calculus problems to relieve the stress of a battle campaign.

20% Off Basic Trig Functions Software!

TrigSoftwareShotSpread the word! We’re offering 20% off the Basic Trig Functions Software during the month of April!

Enter this code, TRIG20, during checkout at http://shop.mathteachersresource.com to receive the 20% discount. The coupon code can be applied to either license option for the software

 

Act now! Offer ends 4/30/15!

Basic Trig Functions, v.3.6, now available!

trig-Graph-1-pdf1As I mentioned in my last blog, I will be offering three main lines of software on my website, mathteachersresource.com. Available now is the first program, Basic Trig Functions, version 3.6. As the title indicates, the main emphasis is on teaching trigonometry at the high school and college level. However, teachers of high school algebra, college algebra and pre-calculus will also find many features of the program to be very useful.

Basic Trig Functions has two modes of operation. The first is circle and trig mode. Use it to:

  • explore standard trigonometric angles, radian measure, arc length, sine, cosine, and tangent functions.
  • create a variety of trig-circle diagrams, which teachers can use to create handouts and test questions.
  • find and graph the powers of a complex number in either standard a + bi or polar format.
  • find and graph the roots of a complex number in either standard a + bi or polar format.
  • graph a wide variety of X-Y variable relations. When the user moves the mouse near a point of intersection, min/max point, or x-intercept, the X-Y coordinates of these points can be found with a click of the mouse.
  • graph polar functions. Users can see how polar points are graphed with the click of a mouse.
  • explore the Mandelbrot Set. Users can graph the orbit of a complex number and a mini-graph of the Julia Set of  a + bi with the click of a mouse.

The second mode of Basic Trig Functions allows teachers to easily demonstrate the geometry of the trig functions and special features of the tangent, cotangent, secant and cosecant functions, and investigate special geometric properties of these functions.

I invite you to visit our website to view screen shots that demonstrate the capabilities of the program. Users can copy all program output to the clipboard to be used in the creation of their own materials.

All the best,

George Johnson

 

New Resource for Math Teachers

George HeadshotWelcome! I’m glad you’ve joined me for this exciting launch of mathteachersresource.com. My mathematics teaching career has covered over 40 years. I have taught courses ranging from general mathematics through calculus, and I am currently teaching College Algebra and Elementary Statistics at my local junior college. Over the years, I have developed software programs that have helped me do a better job of teaching algebra, trigonometry, pre-calculus, calculus and statistics. It is my core belief that teachers should help students understand math concepts from both an algebraic and geometric point of view, and these programs are designed to do that.

The tools found on my website fall into two major categories. The first includes three main lines of software. The second category includes free teacher-created handouts. The first offering of handouts are those created by me; my future goal is to add to this inventory of handouts and to invite other math teachers to share their handouts through the website. More information on this will be coming in future blogs.

My software offers many unique features that make it easy for teachers to give dynamic presentations of core concepts in mathematics. Please visit my website mathteachersresource.com to see some of the possibilities of my program, Basic Trig Functions.

Thank you for joining me for this launch. Feel free to contact me with feedback, and I hope you’ll join me for more in the weeks to come.

~George Johnson